<ol>
<li><strong> Memberships you can’t use now. </strong></li>
</ol>
Life has changed for the foreseeable future. Year-long memberships or season passes you might have thought you’d regularly use are pretty much worthless now. Cancel or pause your monthly membership at the gym and ask for a refund on season passes you may have purchased for a sports team or an amusement park.
<ol start=”2″>
<li><strong> Credit card payments</strong></li>
</ol>
Most credit card companies are making allowances for borrowers who have been financially affected by the coronavirus pandemic. Reach out to yours and ask if you can skip this month’s payment without penalty or if you can pay a little less than usual to avoid a fee.
<ol start=”3″>
<li><strong> Auto insurance premiums</strong></li>
</ol>
Contact your insurance provider to find out what kind of relief they’re offering consumers at this time. Allstate is allowing their subscribers to request to skip up to two consecutive payments without paying late fees. GEICO has announced they will not cancel coverage for consumers who miss payments or allow their policies to expire through April 30 and Liberty will be extending due dates without penalty until further notice.
<ol start=”4″>
<li><strong> Internet </strong></li>
</ol>
If you aren’t locked into an internet plan and you have kids or a college student now at home, consider switching to a free plan. Providers, like Arvig and Spectrum, are currently offering free internet and Wi-Fi to new customers with K-12 or college students at home. Qualifying customers will not have to pay for their service until school reopens.
<ol start=”5″>
<li><strong> Student loan payments</strong></li>
</ol>
On March 20, President Donald Trump announced that all federal student loan borrowers can pause their payments for up to 60 days. Interest will not accrue on these missed payments. Many private student loan companies are making similar allowances for borrowers, so call your lender to discuss your options.

&nbsp;